Endotoxin

(1) A poisonous molecule in the form of a fat/sugar complex (lipopolysaccharide) that forms an integral part of the bacterial (gram-negative bacteria) cell wall and is only released when the integrity of the wall is disturbed and can cause septic shock and tissue damage. Certain organisms may release endotoxins (e.g. E. coli) during biosynthesis of a recombinant DNA product, thus necessitating purification steps to ensure their removal. In water treatment, it most often refers to pyrogens. (2) Pyrogens from certain Gram negative bacteria. Generally highly toxic Lipopolysaccharide-protein complexes (fat, linked sugars, and protein) from cell walls. A marker for these bacteria with a reputation for persistent contamination because they tend to adhere to surfaces.

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